CARE INFORMATION ABOUT LINEN 

Herein you may find care information for:

  • Linen home textiles
  • Waxed linen 
  • Cotton bed linen
  • Glassware
  • Cutlery

LINEN CARE GUIDE

For home linens made from linen. 

ABOUT LINEN

Linen is the strongest natural fibre – it will last generations with proper care. It is naturally lustrous, with a great drape and gets softer with each wash.

Linen increases in strength when wet, meaning it stands up to repeated laundering very well. It also releases stains far more easily than other natural fibres, such as cotton, further increasing its longevity. Ensure to follow correct washing guidance, as noted below, to avoid stains.

PRE-WASHING

Wherever possible, launder your linens as soon as possible. This reduces the chance of stains permeating the fabric. Best practice that is also achievable - if a linens gets very stained during an evening, a good idea is to let is soak in cold water to help release some of the staining prior to washing. 

Stain removers (these often have chlorine within so be mindful on coloured linen and embroideries) can be used to pre-treat stains before washing, such as lipstick or highly pigmented foods. We always recommend to test on a small area on your specific linens before using any pre-stain remover.

Common causes of stains: certain lipstick formulations, lily pollen, turmeric, saffron and similar. Additionally, oil can stain. In these cases, stains are possibly to be removed but pre-washing guidance is advised to follow including pre-treating stains. If stains are still present upon removal from the machine, repeat the process. Where you are cooking with high pigment foods, is it wise to consider using darker linen colours articles. Wine, tomato sauce and similar we find not to stain linen when washed promptly (within a few days). 

WASHING

Linen is machine washable, dependent on any special finishes or embroideries – please always check your care label.

Assuming there are no other decorative details that may impact, natural, white and ivory linens can typically be washed up to 60 degrees, on occasions 90 degrees with stubborn stains. Coloured linens can typically be washed at 40 degrees. Always refer to the care label.

Use a sparing amount of detergent to avoid product build-up. You should always avoid detergent with optical brightening agents or any products containing chlorine. Most “sustainable” detergents are without OBAs, but please check the ingredients. Linen gets softer with every wash, so there is no need to use any type of fabric softener - they add a film to the fabric. An alternative is a cap of distilled white vinegar. You could also add a few drops of essential oil to your wash if you like a fragrant smell. 

Unfold napkins before washing. Avoid overfilling your washing machine to allow detergent and the water to properly distribute. Wash linens with other linens, always in a similar colour, or natural fibres. Try to avoid washing natural fibres with synthetics. 

Always avoid bleach, even diluted. It weakens natural fibres and will degrade them over time.

Linen itself is fine to put on a spin wash, please be mindful of care labels and use these as definite guidance in case of hand embroidered elements or similar. 

DRYING

Never tumble dry linen – it can over dry the fibres – weakening them over time, makes ironing difficult and ultimately just isn’t required. Linen dries very quickly compared with other fabrics such as a cotton.

Linen is incredibly fast-drying, therefore there is no need to tumble dry your linens. Tumble drying is likely to also lead to unnecessary shrinkage. It is best to air dry your linens, whether hanging outside in the summer breeze, or over an indoor airer for a crisp but soft feel.

IRONING 

Iron linen when damp with steam, either by misting with water (it is stronger when wet and it will also help release creases) or by ironing before it is fully dry. It is best to iron the underside first, then the top side, to enhance natural sheen.  

Starch is not necessary but it can be good if you like a crisp finish.

Linen is strongest when wet, so always dampen linen when ironing or iron just before it has fully dried after a wash. Use your iron on a medium to high heat and with steam. You can use starch on your tablecloths, placemats and napkins to keep them beautifully crisp and wrinkle-free. Starch also helps to protect your linens from stains. 

STORING

Use your linen as often as you would like, it is very hardwearing.

Linen is naturally mothproof. When storing, ensure air can get to natural fibres. Storing in a plastic box, for example, can cause yellowing over time. The dust bags our tablecloths are sent in are great for this – making it easy to remove a tablecloth folded under several others. Otherwise, slatted wooden shelves are also optimum. Storing in a linen cupboard or similar is also a great option.

If you are storing for an extended period of time without use, it can be a good idea to re-fold it. Tablecloths can be heavy, and over time, pressure on fold marks can weaken the fibres. A good option is to hang tablecloths over a natural wooden hanger (be mindful of stained wood), or rolling is optimum. 

Cedar or other wooden chests can release acidic gasses that can stain and/or deteriorate the fabric. Similar can happen with heating pipes running through drying cupboards. If you use tissue paper to wrap delicates, always use acid free tissue paper.

REMOVING STAINS FROM LINEN 

The most effective way to avoid permanent stains on your linens is to ensure the speed at which they are treated. If you have ironed over a stain, it is almost impossible to remove.

Oily stains: rub with cold water and salt solution before cool hand washing the stain with liquid soap, then place in washing machine at the highest temperature possible for the item. 

Coffee stains: rub mark with an ice cube inside a clean cloth or tea towels. Once stain has almost disappeared then soak with gentle liquid soap in cold water, then wash as normal. 

For red wine stains: rinse in cold water, add an enzyme detergent to the stain and allow it to set for a few minutes. Wash at the warmest temperature possible for the item. 

For red berry stains: rubbing with a lemon (be mindful of coloured linens, test on a small, inconspicuous area first) can help to move a stain from berries. Wash at the warmest temperature possible for the item. 

 

WAXED LINEN 

Wipe or dab spills as soon as possible with a warm damp cloth. Be mindful that the embroidery is not waxed, so staining is more susceptible in this area.

Avoid high oil content foods as this will penetrate the waxed fabric, as well as extremely pigmented foods such as those with turmeric and saffron.

If heavy soiling occurs, they are washable at 30 degrees on a delicate setting. Air dry. No bleach. Iron high on reverse when damp. Apply pressure and steam as needed.

We recommend to take care of your placemats by wiping them - you can use gentle antibacterial spray as needed. Pre-stain treatments or diluted dishwashing liquid works well on most marks. Store flat or rolled.

COTTON BED LINEN

ABOUT COTTON BED LINEN

Cotton bed linen is our overall preferred fabric for bed sheets. With fabric woven and finished by heritage weavers it is exceptionally soft, breathable, will stay white and have brilliant longevity. It will also get softer with each wash. 

Always follow the care label on your linens in case of special finishes, embroideries and so forth.

WASHING 

Cotton bed linen is machine washable, dependent on any special finishes or embroideries – please always check your care label. 

When washing your cotton bed linen, use a sparing amount of detergent to avoid product build-up. We recommend to avoid detergent with optical brightening agents or any products containing chlorine. Most “sustainable” detergents are without OBAs, but please check the ingredients.

Cotton bed linen will get softer with every wash, but if you like to just a fabric softener we recommend distilled white vinegar as a natural alternative, and possibly adding a few drops of lavender essential oil to your wash. Chemical softeners add a film to textiles.

Avoid overfilling your washing machine to allow detergent and the water to properly distribute. Ideally, wash your bed linen alone and in any case with similar colours. Synthetic materials are harder than natural fibres - it is best to wash natural fibres absent of synthetics.

Never use bleach, even diluted. It weakens natural fibres and will degrade them over time.

Bed linens are suitable for spin wash, but note care labels and use these as definite guidance in case of hand embroidered elements or similar. It is best to spin cottons to avoid drying processing time.  If you have delicate details on your bed sheets, a cotton or linen bag is useful to wash your sheets within - some washing machines can have drums that can damage delicate details on textiles.

Washing your sheets weekly or twice weekly is optimum - it will enable your sheets to stay whiter and brighter for longer as oils are not penetrating the cotton as much. 

DRYING

For cotton bed linens, you can either air dry or tumble dry them (dependent on the care label). 

Air drying is the best way to dry your sheets, if you can. When air drying bed linens, the optimum way is to stretch them out flat. Rebecca Udall cotton bed linens will have few creases when air dried this way. 

If you are tumble drying your bed sheets, ensure to do so on a low heat and always remove your bed sheets before they are fully dry. Drying your sheets to a crisp in the tumble drier will make the fibres go frizzy and therefore feel rough. Cotton wants to retain an element of moisture.

Percale cotton will dry faster than sateen cotton, and a lower thread count will also dry more quickly. 

IRONING

There is nothing comparable to ironed sheets. Iron cotton on a medium to high heat. Embroideries, including scalloped embroidered ends, also look best for an iron. Embroidered details are best ironed on the reverse - it will make the embroidery pop.

STORING

When storing, ensure air can get to your sheets. Storing in a plastic box, for example, can cause yellowing over time. A cotton dust bag is brilliant to keep matching sets within - it keeps them clean, makes for effective organisation and adds a protective layer to possible moths. Slatted wooden shelves are optimum to ensure air flow.

If you are storing for an extended period of time without use, it can be a good idea to re-fold linens. Over time, pressure on fold marks can weaken natural fibres. 

Cedar or other wooden chests can release acidic gasses that can stain and/or deteriorate fabrics. Similar can happen with heating pipes running through drying cupboards - something to be mindful of.

CUTLERY

ABOUT CUTLERY

Our cutlery is suitable for every day use. Our cutlery comes in various materials - stainless steel, bamboo or olive wood as well as acrylic. Follow the details below to maximise the longevity of your cutlery.

Stainless steel & Acrylic Handle 

Cutlery made purely from stainless steel is dishwasher safe. Remove from the dishwasher as soon as possible and wipe with a lint-free soft cloth to dry. Dampen with diluted vinegar solution for additional shine.

Wooden cutlery

Bamboo is hand wash only. Equally, don't allow it to soak in water for long periods of time.

Our Natural Wood cutlery is dishwasher safe but ensure to remove it promptly at the end of a cycle where you can to maintain its condition.

Drying stainless steel blades as soon as possible after washing will reduce marks and maintain the cutlery's condition best.

 

GLASSWARE

ABOUT GLASSWARE

 

Crystal glassware should ideally be hand washed - the dishwasher will reduce shine over time. Best practice is to wash by hand in a solution of warm water with a small amount of pH neutral dish soap. Place upside down on a tea towel to dry.

To polish your glassware, turn your glasses upside down over steaming water and polish with a teal towel in each hand - this will avoid finger marks on any parts of the glass. 

Be mindful never to twist the base and bowl of stemmed glassware in opposite directions, it's a good way to break it!